Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Welcome Martha Reynolds!

Martha Reynold's first novel, Chocolate for Breakfast, effortlessly transports the reader to Switzerland,  and she creates a main character you just have to know more about. The story is heart-wrenching, fascinating and delicious, and I'm so excited to read the sequel, Chocolate Fondue. Martha as a person is kind, warm and funny, and I'm thrilled to have her here today. Welcome, Martha!



Write what you don’t know about what you know 

Elan Barnehama is a straight male who wrote a book (Finding Bluefield) about two lesbians in 1960s Virginia. How did he write about a situation so different from what he knew? We’ve all heard the mantra: “write what you know.” It makes sense, doesn’t it? But the story can be so much better by writing what could happen, perhaps what should happen, instead of what did happen. And it doesn’t mean you can’t use what you do know. Ann Hood’s first novel, Somewhere off the Coast of Maine, involves a teenage girl, Rebekah, who believes her tortured high-school life would be so much better if she could just get a nose job.

Readers thought Hood must have gone through the same trauma. She didn’t, but her memory of wearing too-thick eyeglasses, and having to constantly repair them in class, evoked the same kind of feeling that Rebekah knew. For me to write about my character Bernadette’s experience of an unwanted pregnancy and subsequent decision to carry the child to term and give it up for adoption was sometimes challenging. I don’t have children, and writing about a young woman who makes the decisions Bernadette made provided opportunity for me to dig deep for emotions that would help me to write these passages. Yes, online research is available, but it’s tapping into the inner emotion that will help you write your story.

Elan Barnehama says that all his writing is autobiographical – in that it comes from him – but it’s not biographical, because it’s not about him. Connecting with the essence of the characters’ humanity is what the reader wants, and it’s what propels me as I write about what I don’t know.


Young Bernie (Bernadette) Maguire is in for the journey of a lifetime when her junior year abroad takes her to Fribourg, Switzerland. Ripe for love and adventure, she is seduced by a handsome Swiss banker, but is horrified when she discovers she's pregnant. Protected and befriended by those who help to keep her secret for as long as possible, this moving rite-of-passage tale will warm the heart as a young woman struggles with an all-too-familiar dilemma. Yet after an unexpected death and the discovery of her pregnancy by a classmate, Bernie’s life takes some unexpected turns that will take decades to resolve.

Martha Reynolds’s second novel, Chocolate Fondue, is a continuation of the story told in Chocolate for Breakfast, her award-winning debut novel.



Twenty-three years ago, Bernie Maguire, a young student in Switzerland, delivered a son. Giving him up for adoption was the right decision, she knew, but Bernie always wondered about the boy who was now a young man.

Back in Fribourg, Switzerland for vacation, Bernie is stunned when she sees the man she knows is her son. Now she must decide whether to identify herself to him and hope for a connection, or say nothing and leave the young man to live his life. The matter is complicated by a hotel employee who discovers the truth, and who intends to get in the way of Bernie’s plans.


Martha Reynolds ended an accomplished career as a fraud investigator and began writing full time in 2011. Martha Reynolds published her debut novel, CHOCOLATE FOR BREAKFAST, in 2012. It follows a young woman into adulthood during a year abroad in Switzerland. CHOCOLATE FOR BREAKFAST was voted the 2012 Book of the Year in the category of Women's Fiction by Turning the Pages Books. She and her husband live in New England, never far from the ocean.

Connect with Martha!

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7 comments:

  1. Love, "all writing is autobiographical but not necessarily biographical." Stealing that. For someone who's never been through pregnancy, you still hit the EMOTIONS right on the head, Martha. Can't wait to read Bernie's next installment.

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    1. I really connected with that statement, too, Brea.

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  2. You must get folks all the time thinking you gave a baby up for adoption! I know I get folks who think I've been divorced. (It's my hubs' fear that people will think he cheated on me!)

    You're so right - you just have to take what you do know, and apply it to what you don't!

    Great post!

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    1. Jackie, one of my friends from high school actually sent me a very heartfelt message after reading CFB. She did think I'd gone through all that. I even had to remind my cousins that it was FICTION!

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  3. Uh oh, will people think I'm a prostitute because of Carrie in "Streetwalker"? LOL I guess my picture will be evidence against that assumption. I agree, Martha, we need to tap into the creative well and exploit the what-ifs of the story line. But, of course, part of your verisimilitude comes from what you do know. You made Switzerland real to us because of your own experiences. It must be a blend, or the reader will see it as false.

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    1. Good one, Sharon! Yes, so much of what happened that year was true (the death, the way I learned of the death, the wonderful places and the food!). I'm using the "write what you don't know about what you know" model in the new book as well. Thanks for commenting!

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  4. I'll add to that by saying people might think I have tendencies to kill people. Oh wait, that could apply. LOL!

    What a great analogy about digging deep to find the emotions of the characters and their struggle. We might not know exactly what they are feeling, but we can draw from other experiences in our lives.

    Great post!

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